May 19-June 17, 2018
Opening reception: Saturday, May 19, 2-5 p.m.
Curated by Melissa Smith


Intuit's Teacher Fellowship Program Student Exhibition will showcase participants in the 2017-2018 Teacher Fellowship Program. Inspired by self-taught and outsider art, students transform found and non-traditional materials into art pieces that reflect their personal visions. Join us for a free, family-friendly opening reception on May 19.

The Teacher Fellowship Program is Intuit's award-winning professional development program for teachers from Chicago Public Schools that reaches more than 600 students across Chicago annually. The core value of the program is enabling teachers to give their students an opportunity to translate their personal vision to art-making using non-traditional materials in a non-judgmental environment: Each person has creative potential. By participating in the program, teachers collaborate with colleagues on a lesson plan to help their students integrate the characteristics of outsider art into cross-disciplinary arts learning. Intuit's Teacher Fellowship Program is sponsored in part by generous grants from Crown Family Philanthropies, Polk Bros Foundation, Terra Foundation for American Art, Alphawood Foundation, and Driehaus Foundation.


 Prophet William J. Blackmon (American, 1921-2010).  The Family Path of the Whole Earth to Heaven , n.d. Latex and enamel paint on plywood. Milwaukee Art Museum, Gift of the artist. M1988.179

Prophet William J. Blackmon (American, 1921-2010). The Family Path of the Whole Earth to Heaven, n.d. Latex and enamel paint on plywood. Milwaukee Art Museum, Gift of the artist. M1988.179

March 23-June 10, 2018
Opening Reception:
Thursday, March 22, 5-8 p.m.
Curated by Matt Arient and Tim Bruce


In 2018, Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art will feature two major exhibitions focusing on place, To Be Seen and Heard, highlighting Wisconsin as a place where art was made, and Chicago Calling: Art Against the Flow, which explores the role of Chicago in the critical reception of outsider art.

On view at Intuit from March 23 – June 17, 2018, To Be Seen and Heard brings attention to 5 Wisconsin artists: Prophet William J. Blackmon, Josephus Farmer, Simon Sparrow, Albert Zahn, and Eugene Von Bruenchenhein. These often under-recognized artists/preachers/environment builders created works, not in isolation, but “To Be Seen and Heard.”  

This exhibition will feature nearly fifty paintings, photographs, sculptures, and reliefs. From the signs and religious imagery of Prophet J. Blackmon and Josephus Farmer, to the mixed media constructions of Simon Sparrow, to the carvings of Albert Zahn, and paintings and photographs by Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, the exhibition will highlight the important contribution these artists have made to the art world. Wisconsin has produced and fostered a great number of artists and creative thinkers. To Be Seen and Heard highlights a select few who deserve a wider audience.

Press coverage of this exhibition:
The best art exhibits to see in Chicago in March (TimeOut Chicago)
62 Things to Do in Chicago in March (Chicago Magazine)
This Summer's Must-See Museum Shows (Milwaukee Magazine)


January 26-May 13, 2018
Opening Reception: Friday, January 26, 5:30-8:30 p.m. with an artist and curator Q&A discussion, 7 p.m.
Curated by Michael Noland and Keith Sadler


After attending University of Chicago for just a year, then serving in the United States Navy for four years, Rockford, Ill. native Stephen Warde Anderson decided he’d spend the rest of his life creating things.

His nontraditional route to uncovering his artistic talents, as well as his skills being entirely self-taught, make Anderson’s work all the more astonishing. Stephen Warde Anderson: Attention to Detail captures the pointillist techniques he employed in his earliest works. Anderson’s art is heavily concentrated in portraits of film stars, famous women and historical subjects. Intuit will be showcasing more than 30 of these paintings, two never-before-seen by the public. Attention to Detail will unite many of his original pieces, as most have been dispersed between private collections.

Anderson began his foray into the art world through charcoal and pencil drawings, and then graduated on to painting through the development of his own methods for production, such as mixing tempera with his own saliva. He also fashioned flexible stylus instruments from small cut pieces of whipped cream containers, which he used alongside sewing needles to create tiny paint dots and striations.

This exhibition focuses primarily on the naissance of Anderson’s career as an artist, during which time his portraits stand out as remarkably meticulous. Anderson’s first paintings each took well over a year for him to finish, speaking to his intense attention to detail, as reflected in the show’s title.

There will be an opening reception celebration Friday, January 26, 2018 from 5:30-8:30 p.m., and the exhibition will be on view until Sunday, May 13, 2018. 

Press coverage of this exhibition:
Stephen Warde Anderson: One-of-a-Kind Painter Has One-Man Show (WTTW Chicago Tonight)


Philip Carey: Art in My Veins

March 22-May 13, 2018
 

The work of Philip Carey can be described as colorful, wacky, strange and full of fun. Born in 1942 in Long Beach, Calif., Carey creates art inspired by his dreams and the medical treatments he received between 2004 and 2015. During this period, Carey was diagnosed with heart disease, kidney disease and prostate cancer, and he began collecting the medical ephemera associated with his treatment.

While on dialysis, Carey completed more than 400 drawings on No. 10 envelopes. The experience of dialysis treatment and the time it required—3½ hours a day three times a week for six years—provided the artistic impetus for this “postal art,” which explores “the adventures of mini-Philip,” phobias, “places I would rather be than dialysis,” landscapes, travel and graphics.

Carey’s “Bandage Faces,” actual ornamented and framed bandages gathered from his dialysis treatments, are expressive self-portraits that reflect his moods and feelings while on the dialysis machine. His dream drawings consist of sketches and stories drawn with ink and Prismacolor pencils on 3 x 5-inch Post-It notes. Carey admits, “Dream analysis doesn’t matter to me at all. I really enjoy the fact that things are hiding somewhere in there, and they just happen to come out.”

Carey received a bachelor’s degree in exhibit design from California State University at Long Beach. His recent large-scale work is created from the ephemera of 40 years as an exhibit designer and 10 years as a patient. His life-sized medical self-portrait, Art In My Veins, was recently exhibited at the American Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore.

The work in this exhibition invites viewers to think about the multiple forms confinement and isolation may take—in Carey’s case, the experience of 3,000 hours of dialysis and more than 25 operations and medical procedures—and their potential to engender artistic output.


 Dapper Bruce Lafitte (American, b. 1971). T.D.B.C. Presents Its No Good Being a Davenport Jr ., 2015. Archival ink on acid free paper, 22 x 30 in. Collection of Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art

Dapper Bruce Lafitte (American, b. 1971).T.D.B.C. Presents Its No Good Being a Davenport Jr., 2015. Archival ink on acid free paper, 22 x 30 in. Collection of Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art

February 9-March 18, 2018
 

Black Voices from the Collection celebrates African-American artists from the 20th century. The exhibition includes paintings, drawings and sculptures by Thornton Dial, Sr., Bessie Harvey, Lonnie Holley, Dapper Bruce Lafitte, Dr. Charles Smith, Inez Nathaniel Walker, Mr. Imagination (Gregory Warmack) and Wesley Willis. Showcasing works from Intuit's collection, Black Voices highlights black art and culture, and explores themes of gender, city life, use of recycled materials and civil rights history.


 Eddie Owens Martin/St. EOM (American, 1908-1986). Untitled, n.d. Gouache on paper, 11.75 x 16 in. Image courtesy of LaGrange Art Museum

Eddie Owens Martin/St. EOM (American, 1908-1986). Untitled, n.d. Gouache on paper, 11.75 x 16 in. Image courtesy of LaGrange Art Museum

December 22, 2017-March 11, 2018
Opening Reception: Friday, January 5, 5:30-8:30 p.m. 
Curated by Fred C. Fussell
 

Eddie Owens Martin (1908-1986), who, in his later years, referred to himself as St. EOM, was the creator of Pasaquan. This visionary artist, who had no formal training, reveled in the intuitive creative art process. St. EOM was influenced by many artistic traditions, including Mesoamerican, African and eastern art, but the content of his work was constructed from utopian visions.

Pasaquan is a seven-acre art environment that consists of six major structures, more than 900 feet of painted masonry fence, painted totems, decorative walkways, sculptures, and other art and artifacts in southwest Georgia’s Marion County. Pasaquan is considered among the most important visionary art environments in the United States. Nearly 30 years after the artist’s death—long after the brightly painted masonry had begun to fade literally and figuratively—the Kohler Foundation, the Pasaquan Preservation Society and Columbus State University partnered to bring this extraordinary art environment back to life.

This exhibition features a large selection of never-before-seen original drawings, sculptures, paintings, regalia, adornments and other examples of art by St. EOM. Through the use of original art, informational text panels, and vintage and contemporary photographs, this colorful exhibit tells the incredible story of the life of the creator of Pasaquan.

In the Land of Pasaquan: The Story of Eddie Owens Martin originated from the LaGrange Art Museum, and is made available by the courtesy of Columbus State University, Columbus State University Foundation, Inc., Pasaquan in Buena Vista, Georgia, and through a gift by the Kohler Foundation, Inc.

Press coverage of this exhibition:
At Intuit, only a glimpse of the immersive art environment Pasaquan (Chicago Reader)
Outside Art: Intuit- The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art (Quiet Lunch)
Intuit Review- A visit to The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art, Chicago (Splash Magazines)


 Eugene Von Bruenchenhein (American, 1910-1983). Untitled (Portrait of artist’s wife, Marie), n.d. Gelatin silver print, 10 x 8 in. Collection of Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art, gift of Lewis, Jean and Dan Greenblatt. 2003.3.4

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein (American, 1910-1983). Untitled (Portrait of artist’s wife, Marie), n.d. Gelatin silver print, 10 x 8 in. Collection of Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art, gift of Lewis, Jean and Dan Greenblatt. 2003.3.4

December 22, 2017-February 6, 2018


Take a blustery stroll through our winter-themed  miniature gallery, featuring some of Intuit's holiday pieces. With works from Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, Mary Eveland, Clementine Hunter and Frank Signoretti, this is a seasonal peek into the museum's own collection.